Tag: Kanban Transformation

Role-based Guidance: How Might the Kanban Method Influence Your Role?

“So much of what we call management consists in making it difficult for people to work.” — Peter Drucker

“As a job seeker, remember this: You only lack experience if they want it done the same old way.” — Robert Brault

“Deciding what not to do is as important as deciding what to do.” — Steve Jobs

“Out of clutter, find simplicity.” — Albert Einstein

 KLRUS14 – Monterey

In January leading practitioners and coaches of the Kanban Method gathered at the Kanban Leadership Retreat. While preparing our “just-in-time” agenda at the start, a topic suggested for discussion was a variation on a question we had all heard often, “How does ‘kanban’ impact my role: as a Project Manager, or as a Business Analyst, or as Product Manager, or as a Program Manager?” It was definitely interesting to hear responses from others to this question, and for me it was one of the more useful sessions.

First Things First

Confused-Cartoon-Face1Since the Kanban Method is not a specific workflow methodology or process, and therefore is not something that replaces your current workflow process, but rather a tool that can be used to improve any workflow process, it doesn’t prescribe specific roles. It isn’t that kind of tool.

It’s also helpful to consider that improving your current workflow, even in significant ways, won’t necessarily require creating and defining “new roles and practices.” Still, it is important to recognize using it as a tool to improve your current workflow process should clearly result in some noteworthy changes. Right?

A good place to start is to understand upfront that a core component of the “Kanban Method” is using a kanban system, or even more fundamentally using a “pull based system”, to help address obstacles to creating and maintaining a predictable workflow and improving performance over time. That is, if you’re not familiar with “pull systems”, I’d suggest to anyone using the Kanban Method to first focus on understanding the fundamental changes to pull thinking. Allow this new thinking in turn to influence the ideas and experiments (changes) that emerge for improving the design and operations of your workflow process.1 Then, if necessary and only as needed, consider any benefits that might exist from adding (or removing) roles and associated practices. (continue reading…)


Business and Technology Peacefully Co-creating

Written in direct collaboration with Richard Hensley (McKesson AVP).

“Knowledge is an unending adventure at the edge of Uncertainty.” - Jacob Bronowski, British mathematician, biologist, historian of science, poet, inventor, author of “The Ascent of Man”

“Maturity of mind is the capacity to endure Uncertainty.” – John Huston Finley, 1938 – New York Times editor-in-chief

“Many high performers would rather do the wrong thing well than do the right thing poorly.” – Thomas J. Delong & Sara DeLong, “Managing Yourself: The Paradox of Excellence”, June 2011 – Harvard Business Review

It’s common to see an organization (the people in them) focus on building systems with as many features as possible and targeting delivery by a specific due date. Yet, often the result is missing the date while also ignoring other important goals demanded by the businesses such as high levels of product quality, development productivity, planning reliability, employee satisfaction, and customer loyalty. Retrospectives, if done after such an occurrence, surface the dissatisfaction concerning missed dates, poor quality, technical debt, and more, still frequently this pattern repeats. Does this scenario sound familiar to you? If so, why do you think it is so? In a past or maybe your current organization, I’m guessing you’ve heard or thought, “We need our business and technology people on the same page.” How might “being on the same page” look in your organization? Does your current software development methodology, its principles, processes, and practices, contribute effectively to this objective? Is getting on the “same page” with objectives and goals enough? 

Over the last three years Richard Hensley, AVP Process at McKesson Health Solutions, has worked to address these challenges within the three business units of the division he works in at McKesson. I’ve been able to catch up with him on several occasions and discuss his efforts over these years. This post is a brief “fly-over” of his experience, capturing some of the key thoughts Richard developed over this time, and shared during our conversations.

No Silver Bullets Here!

Anyone reading a blog post on getting business and technology people on the same page probably knows there is no “silver bullet” to this challenge. Chances are good you’ve already been a part of such an effort, right? If so, you know it is not a simple task. Or even if you saw them start out on the same page in your organization, did issues appear that caused this working relationship to return to its earlier challenging state?

In short, Richard suggests, “you won’t find quick fixes for this issue” and his experience indicates it takes a serious effort from both sides. It also requires a continuous commitment over time because “getting everyone on the same page is a good start but not sufficient to sustain the business.” Yes, getting on the same page upfront, by itself, can be a positive thing as it helps everyone feel good, knowing where others are at and being in the know. If you’re familiar with the practice of daily stand-ups, you can draw a comparison, getting on the same page only is like a stand-up where team members simply provide “status” of their work. It is a good start, but alone it is ineffective for helping to solve real issues. In a similar fashion, getting on the same page with objectives and goals, if that is all you do, doesn’t help anyone address how things might be done more quickly or more effectively. It is a good start, but more is needed! (continue reading…)


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  • Upcoming Events

    Global, National, and Local Events:
    Agile Denver Kanban SIG - Denver, CO; Oct 9, 2014, from 6:00-8:00 pm. Location for this month will be at ReadyTalk. I co-lead this special interest group w/ Dan Wyks. Click link above for more info about this SIG and our next mtg.

    Engagements and Tutorials:
    Kanban Metrics Coaching Philidelphia, PA; Apr-Sep, 2014. In conjunction with Corporate Kanban, providing embedded coaching to private client on applying kanban (flow) metrics along with the Kanban Method to improve workflow delivery and predictability.

    Kanban Metrics Data Collection Support Philidelphia, PA; Jun-Sep, 2014. In conjunction with Corporate Kanban, providing private client with custom application/programming support to automate extraction of kanban (flow) metrics from VersionOne, and feeding into custom analysis and display tools.

    Kanban Coaching Sarasota, FL; Aug-Sep, 2014. In conjunction with Corporate Kanban, providing embedding coaching to private client on introducing and applying kanban (flow) principles and practices, along with initial flow metrics improve workflow delivery and predictability

    If interested in custom tutorials on Kanban Metrics or on appying the Kanban Method in your context, or embedded coaching, please contact Frank Vega.

    Past Events:
    Click here for past presentations and major events attended. If interested in similar presentations at your company, user group, or conference, please contact Frank Vega.

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